BEng 1. 6 1. Explanation of a Weighted

BEng (Hons) Electrical Electronic Engineering
TM625: Electronics and Control
Assignment 2
S13302

Table of Contents
Table of
Figures. 2
Abbreviations. 4
Task 1. 6
1.    Explanation of a Weighted resistor DAC.. 6
2.    Explanation of a R-2R DAC.. 7
3.    Explanation of a Successive Approximation ADC.. 8
Task 2. 9
1.    Explain circuit operation and modes. 9
2.    Acquisition time. 10
3.    Aperture
time. 10
4.    Drift Rate. 11
5.    Settling time. 11
6.    Hold step. 12
7.    Turn – off time. 12
8.    Time taken for the Capacitor voltage to reach 99% of the input. 13
Task 3. 14
1.    TF = (2S+9)/(S2+2S+4), Gain of 2. 14
2.    PID System.. 17
3.    PI System.. 20
4.    PD System.. 23
5.    Compare Transfer Function with Second order system equation.. 26
6.    Comparison of the performance of PI, PD and PID systems. 27
Task 4. 28
1.    Flash ADC.. 28
2.    Circuit Build Figures. 29
References. 32
 

Table of Figures
Figure 1:
Weighted Resistor DAC Circuit (Wilkins et al., 1975) 6
Figure 2:
R-2R Ladder DAC Circuit 7
Figure 3: Successive
Approximation ADC (Kester, 2008) 8
Figure 4:
Sample and hold circuit 9
Figure 5:
Acquisition time graph (Kester, 2009) 10
Figure 6:
Aperture Time Graph (Kester, 2009) 10
Figure 7:
Drift Rate Graph (Kester, 2009) 11
Figure 8:
Settling Time Graph (Instruments, 1992) 11
Figure 9:
Hold Step Graph (Instruments, 1992) 12
Figure 10:
Turn Off Time (Kester, 2009) 12
Figure 11:
RC Time Constant Table (Patrick and Fardo, 2000) 13
Figure 12:
Transfer Function System.. 14
Figure 13:
PID System Response. 14
Figure 14:
PID Steady State Error 15
Figure 15:
PID Values. 16
Figure 16:
PID System.. 17
Figure 17:
PID Response. 17
Figure 19:
PID Steady State Error 18
Figure 18:
PID Gain.. 18
Figure 20:
PID Derivative. 19
Figure 21: PID Intergrator 19
Figure 22:
PI System.. 20
Figure 23:
PI System Response. 20
Figure 24:
PI Steady State Error 21
Figure 25:
PI Integrator 21
Figure 26:
PI Gain.. 22
Figure 27:
PI Derivative. 22
Figure 28:
PD System.. 23
Figure 29:
PD System Response. 23
Figure 30:
PD Steady State Error 24
Figure 31:
PD Integrator 24
Figure 32:
PD Gain.. 25
Figure 33:
PD Derivative. 25
Figure 34:
System Damping. 26
Figure 35:
Flash ADC Schematic. 28
Figure 36:
Priority Encoder Function Table (Instruments, 2004) 28
Figure 37:
Flash ADC Circuit Build. 29
Figure 38:
Flash ADC Circuit Build. 29
Figure 39:
Flash ADC LEDs. 30
Figure 40:
Flash ADC Circuit 30
Abbreviations
 

DAC

Digital
to Analogue Converter

ADC

Analogue to Digital
Converter

MSB

Most
significant bit

LSB

Least
significant bit

SAR

Successive
Approximation Register

FET

Field-effect
transistor

PID

Proportional–Integral–Derivative
Controller

 

 

Task 1
1.   
Explanation of a Weighted resistor DAC

V1                   V2                   V3                   V4
 

Figure 1: Weighted Resistor DAC
Circuit (Wilkins et al., 1975)
The weighted resistors DAC circuit
consists of resistors and an operational amplifier. Vout is sum of the input
voltages. If the values of the input resistors are set to multiples of two
e.g. 1kohm, 2kohm, 4kohm, 8kohm, the output voltage would be equal to the sum
of the input voltages multiplied by the ratio of input resistors and feedback
resistor, this gives the equation:

 
(Wilkins et al., 1975)
Therefore if, VR = 5V, V1 = 1, V2
= 0, V3 = 1, V4 = 1 or 1011 and Rf = 1,000 Ohms. The output formula would be:

k = -0.6875V
 
 
 
 
2.   
Explanation of a R-2R DAC
The circuit for a 4-bit DAC using binary weighted resistor network is
shown below:

Figure 2: R-2R Ladder DAC Circuit
An alternative to the Weighted Resistor DAC is the R-2R Ladder DAC.
This type of DAC uses two resistor values, R and 2 * R. when each input is
supplied with a logic level 0 or a logic level 1 the output will be the
voltage equivalent and the binary input. It’s advantage of the weighted
resistor DAC is that it has fewer different values.
The output can be given from the equation:

 (Electronics, 2004)
Where:
·        
Rf
= R9 (20,000Ohms)
·        
Ra
= R7 (10,000Ohms)
·        
N
= number in decimal form i.e. 1001 = 9.
·        
n
= number of bits in the system i.e. 4 bits in total.
·        
Vr
= reference voltage, i.e. 5V
Therefore, to calculate the output if the binary input is 1001 would
be;

3.   
Explanation of a Successive Approximation ADC
 

Figure 3: Successive
Approximation ADC (Kester, 2008)
The
Successive Approximation ADC is a convertor that continuously converts an
analogue signal into a digital output by a binary search method. The SAR ADC
start by trying all the values of bits starting the MSB and finishing with the
LSB.
For
example, a SAR ADC with 4-bit resolution.
·        
Vref
= 1V
·        
Vin
= 0.6V.
·        
Vadc
= internal comparator voltage
The
ADC starts with the MSB (Bit-3). Vref is divided by 2 and compared with Vin.
As Vin is greater than Vref/2, it turns MSB to a logic 1.

1

X

X

X

The
next calculation is for the MSB-1 (bit-2), Vin is compared to Vadc = Vref/2+Vref/4
= 0.5+0.25V = 0.75. As Vin < Vadc (0.75V) bit 2 is turned off. 1 0 X X For MSB-2 (bit-1) is compared with Vref/2 + Vref/8 = 0.625. as 0.6V < 0.625, the MSB is turned off. 1 0 0 X For MSB-3 (bit-0) is compared with Vref/2 + Vref/16 = 0.5625. as 0.6V > 0.5625,
the MSB is turned on.

1

0

0

1

Task 2

Figure 4: Sample and hold circuit
1.   
Explain circuit operation and modes
The sample and hold circuit is
used to capture an analogue voltage. There are two modes – sample (also known
as track) and hold, below is a description of the operation of each.
In the sample mode, the sample
control node is held to a logic 1 – the buffered input voltage flows the FET and
charges the capacitor. In this mode the output voltage will match the input
voltage.
In the hold mode, when the sample
control node is a logic 0, the FET is turned off. At this point the capacitor
is disconnected from the input circuitry and retains the sampled voltage, this
is then slowly discharged through the resistor and the op-amp to create a Vout.
 
 
 
 
 
2.   
Acquisition time

Figure 5: Acquisition time graph (Kester,
2009)
The acquisition time is the length of time that the circuit must remain
in the sample mode to acquire a full-scale output. The maximum acquisition
time arises when the hold capacitor charges to a full-scale voltage change. This
period depends on the size of the hold capacitor. The acquisition time can be reduced by
choosing a smaller value capacitor, however this will also increase discharge
rate.
3.   
Aperture time

Figure 6: Aperture Time Graph (Kester,
2009)
The aperture time, is the delay
between the hold signal being applied and the input signal being disconnected
from the hold capacitor.
4.   
Drift Rate

Figure 7: Drift Rate Graph (Kester,
2009)
This drift rate can be expressed
in V/us, during the hold mode there can be errors in the holding capacitor, the
buffer amplifiers and switch. If a leakage current flows in or out of the hold
capacitor, this would slowly reduce or increase the voltage in the capacitor.
5.   
Settling time

Figure 8: Settling Time Graph (Instruments,
1992)
The settling time is the time that the system takes for the output
voltage to stabilise within an error band after the system has received the
hold command.
6.   
Hold step

Figure 9: Hold Step Graph (Instruments,
1992)
The hold step is the voltage at the output due to the sample-to-hold
transition. It is caused by a transfer of charge to the hold capacitor due to
the opening of the switch.
 
7.   
Turn – off time

Figure 10: Turn Off Time (Kester,
2009)
The
turn off time is the delay time between the hold command being sent to the
switch and the point when the final voltage charge is held at the capacitor.
8.   
Time taken for the Capacitor voltage to reach
99% of the input.
·        
ON
resistance = 30?
·        
C1
= 1µF
 

Time Constant

RC Value

Voltage percentage of max.

1.0 time constant

1T = 1RC

63%

2.0-time constants

2T = 2RC

86%

3.0-time constants

3T = 3RC

95%

4.0-time constants

4T = 4RC

98%

5.0-time constants

5T = 5RC

99%

Figure 11: RC Time Constant Table
(Patrick and Fardo, 2000)
The formula to calculate the time the voltage in the capacitor charges
to within 1 percent of the input voltage is:

 (Patrick and Fardo, 2000)
Therefore,

 
Task 3
1.   
TF = (2S+9)/(S2+2S+4), Gain of 2

Figure 12: Transfer
Function System
 

Figure 13: PID System Response
The graph above shows the system response, settling at
around 7 seconds.
 

Figure 14: PID Steady State Error
The graph above shows a steady state error of 0.0001
 
 

Figure 15: PID Values
P
= 0.2222222222, I = 0.00000000001
D = 0.00000000001
 
 
 
 
2.   
PID System

Figure 16: PID System
 

Figure 17: PID Response
The above graph is the response of
the PID system, shown to settle at around 8 seconds.
 

Figure 19: PID Steady State Error
The above graph is the steady state error of the PID
system, with an error of 0.0001.

Figure 18: PID Gain
G = 0.1

Figure 20: PID Derivative
D = 50

Figure 21: PID Intergrator
I = 0.1749
3.    PI System

Figure 22: PI System
 

Figure 23: PI System Response
The graph above is the response of
the PI system, shown to settle at around 8 seconds.
 

Figure 24: PI Steady State Error
The graph above is the steady state error of the PID
system, with an error of 0.0
 

Figure 25: PI Integrator
I = 0.1749
 

Figure 26: PI Gain
G = 0.1
 

Figure 27: PI Derivative
D = 0
 
 
 
4.   
   PD System

Figure 28: PD System
 

Figure 29: PD System Response
The graph above is the response of the PD system, shown to
settle at around 9 seconds.
 

Figure 30: PD Steady State Error
The graph above is the steady state error of the PID
system, with an error of 0.0008

Figure 31: PD Integrator
I = 0
 

Figure 32: PD Gain
G = 0.165

 
Figure 33: PD Derivative
D = 50
 
 
 
5.   
Compare Transfer Function with Second order
system equation
The second order transfer function
can be expressed as:

 (Levine, 2011)
The damping ratio,

 is a value signifying
the amount at which an oscillation in the systems response reduces due to
effects, such as resistance.
If;

 >1 the
system is over-damped

 <1 the system is under-damped  =1 the system is critically-damped Figure 34: System Damping  refers to the natural frequency that the system will oscillate (in rad/s) when =0. K refers to the DC gain of the system, this is the ratio of the magnitude of the steady-state response to the input.   6.    Comparison of the performance of PI, PD and PID systems In the PID system the overshoot reaches just under 0.2, the PI system has a similar overshoot while the PD system reaches 0.35. All the systems reach a steady state at around 8 seconds. The steady state error of the PD system is the largest at 0.0008, the PI error is 0.0 and the PID steady state error is 0.0001. To reduce the steady state error, the rise time and the stability of the system there were three variables; Kp – this is the proportional controller which had the effect of reducing the rise time Ki - this is the integral controller which had the effect of reducing the steady state error. Kd – this is the derivative controller which has the effect of reducing the over shoot. From the results of the PID, PD and PI simulations the PI controller can be used to reduce the steady state error, the PD controller is the most unstable system with the largest overshoot. The PID has a very low steady state error and rises the fastest.   Task 4 1.    Flash ADC Figure 35: Flash ADC Schematic (Ashby, 2008) A flash ADC consists of an array of comparators, a resistor voltage divider and an encoder. The divider network is supplied with a reference voltage. Therefore, each comparator compares an attenuated reference voltage with the analogue input voltage. The priority encoder takes the 8 inputs and reduces them into a binary output see figure 35. The flash ADC is suggested to be most efficient type of ADC, being limited only by the propagation delay of the gates. The disadvantage of this ADC is that it requires an extensive number of components. Figure 36: Priority Encoder Function Table (Instruments, 2004)   2.    Circuit Build Figures Figure 37: Flash ADC Circuit Build Figure 38: Flash ADC Circuit Build Figure 39: Flash ADC LEDs Figure 40: Flash ADC Circuit   Part of this assignment was to construct a Flash ADC using the circuit in figure 37; ·         1x LM74148 - priority encoder ·         2x LM339 – Quad differential amplifier ·         18x 1k resistors ·         7x 3k resistors ·         10x LEDs ·         1x 100ohm potentiometer During the circuit build the author attempted to test the circuit in modular blocks to ensure that was built so far was functioning as intended. Initially the circuit was built without the priority encoder the connected, once tested only three LEDs were illuminating, the other five LEDs were not working, possible due an incorrect wire somewhere in the circuit.   References ·         Kester, W. (2009). Aperture Time, Aperture Jitter, Aperture Delay Time— Removing the Confusion. 1st ed. ebook ANALOG DEVICES. Available at: http://www.analog.com/media/en/training-seminars/tutorials/MT-007.pdf Accessed 18 Jan. 2018. ·         Instruments, T. (1992). Specifications and Architectures of Sample-and-Hold Amplifiers. 1st ed. ebook National Semiconductor. Available at: http://www.ti.com.cn/cn/lit/an/snoa223/snoa223.pdf Accessed 18 Jan. 2018. ·         Electronics, T. (2004). R/2R LADDER NETWORKS - Application Note. 2nd ed. ebook TT Electronics. Available at: http://www.ttelectronics.com/themes/ttelectronics/datasheets/resistors/literature/LADDERNETWORKS.pdf Accessed 19 Jan. 2018. ·         Grout, I. (2006). Integrated Circuit Test Engineering. New York: Springer-Verlag London Limited. ·         Patrick, D. and Fardo, S. (2000). Understanding DC circuits. Boston: Newnes. ·         Levine, W. (2011). Control system fundamentals. Boca Raton, Fla. u.a.: CRC Press. ·         Instruments, T. (2004). 8-Line to 3-Line Priority Encoders. ebook TI. Available at: http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/sn74ls148.pdf Accessed 19 Jan. 2018. ·         Kester, W. (2008). ADC Architectures II: Successive Approximation ADCs. 1st ed. ebook ANALOG DEVICES. Available at: http://www.analog.com/media/en/training-seminars/tutorials/MT-021.pdf Accessed 19 Jan. 2018. ·         DAC AND BINARY-WEIGHTED RESISTOR DAC. (2014). 1st ed. ebook IDC Online. Available at: http://www.idc-online.com/technical_references/pdfs/electronic_engineering/Dac_And_Binary_Weighted_Resistor_Dac.pdf Accessed 19 Jan. 2018. ·         Wilkins, C., Perone, S., Klopfenstein, C., Williams, R. and Jones, D. (1975). Digital Electronics and Laboratory Computer Experiments. Boston, MA: Springer US. ·         Ashby, D. (2008). Circuit design. Amsterdam etc.: Newnes/Elsevier.